Fed-OSHA fines Alabama car parts plant

Fed-OSHA has fined an Auburn, Alabama auto parts manufacturer nearly $50,000 for allegedly exposing workers to electrical and amputation hazards. According to the agency, the plant had had inadequate machine guarding, failed to implement lockout/tagout procedures during machine maintenance and servicing, failed to implement safety procedures for entering a robotic cage; and exposed employees to hazardous energy. WSFA (Montgomery, Ala.)[with video]

Worker injured at El Paso school construction site

Fed-OSHA has confirmed that a worker at an El Paso, Texas middle school construction site was injured last week when he was caught in between two pieces of equipment. KVIA (El Paso, Texas) [with video]

IOSHA fines employer after struck-by death

Indiana OSHA has fined a Bloomington masonry construction company $11,200 after a 35-year-old construction worker was killed in April while working on a major renovation project at Indiana University Bloomington. The fatal accident occurred when a section of limestone that was being lifted above a doorway fell and struck him. RTV6 (Indianapolis)

Akron chemical plant that exploded has history of violations

Emerald Performance Materials, the company that owns an Akron, Ohio chemical plant where an explosion last week led to an evacuation, has a history of non-compliance and health and safety violations. In a 2013 inspection, the Environmental Protection Agency said the company failed to timely report the release of flammable butadiene. WKYC (Cleveland) [with video]

Utility worker’s widow files wrongful death suit against employer

The June 2016 electrocution of a 44-year-old private utility contractor has resulted in a lawsuit by the man’s widow against the Wilton, Connecticut construction company, alleging that the power line should have been de-energized. Fed-OSHA, which investigated the incident, found that the worker was preparing a worksite for installation of a new utility pole when the equipment he was operating came into contact with a high-voltage transmission line. The Hour (Norwalk, Conn.)

One dead in New Mexico tank battery fire

An oilfield worker was killed and another was injured after a tank battery caught fire Wednesday near Loving, New Mexico. The facility contains a saltwater disposal well for oil byproducts from extraction operations, along with injection pumps and storage tanks. Carlsbad Current-Argus

U.S. Department of Labor Joins Partnership to Promote Workplace Safety During Georgia Construction Project

July 20, 2018

ATLANTA, GA – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) signed a strategic partnership with the Georgia Tech Enterprise Innovation Institute’s Safety, Health, and Environmental Services Group; Associated General Contractors of Georgia Inc. (AGC Georgia); and Brasfield & Gorrie LLC to promote workplace safety and health during the construction of the Coca-Cola United South Metro Sales Center and Warehouse in Union City, Georgia.

OSHA’s partnership will address falls, struck-by, caught-in between, electrical, silica, and noise hazards, as well as heat illness prevention.

Through its Strategic Partnership Program, OSHA works with employers, employees, professional and trade associations, labor organizations, and other interested stakeholders to establish specific goals, strategies, and performance measures to improve worker safety and health.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov/.

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Alabama Auto Parts Manufacturer For Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards

July 20, 2018

AUBURN, AL – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited auto parts manufacturer Arkal Automotive USA Inc. for exposing workers to electrical and amputation hazards. The Auburn, Alabama, company faces $47,857 in proposed penalties.

OSHA investigators responded to a complaint that employees were not properly protected while entering injection molding machines. OSHA cited the employer for inadequate machine guarding; failing to implement lockout/tagout procedures during machine maintenance and servicing; failing to implement safety procedures for entering a robotic cage; and exposing employees to hazardous energy.

“Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe injuries when they are not properly guarded and safety procedures are absent,” said OSHA Mobile Area Office Director Joseph Roesler. “Arkal Automotive USA Inc. failed to identify and correct hazards to ensure the safety and health of their employees.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Wisconsin Contractor For Repeatedly Exposing Workers to Falls

July 19, 2018

APPLETON, WI ‒ The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited Carlos Ketz, who operates as Ketz Roofing, for the sixth time in the past five years for exposing employees to falls. OSHA proposed penalties totaling $48,777.

OSHA inspectors cited the roofing contractor – based in Menasha, Wisconsin – after observing employees working without adequate fall protection on a commercial building in Appleton.

“Employers are required to provide fall protection to employees working in construction at heights above 6 feet,” said OSHA Appleton Area Office Director Robert Bonack. “Ketz Roofing’s repeated failure to comply with federal safety requirements exposes employees to fatal injuries from falls, which remains the leading cause of fatalities in the construction industry.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.